summer time in Prague park

Kick off Summer: Letná Park

For many Praguers, summer is incomplete without frequent visits to Letná Park. At 52 hectares, Letná Park is among the largest continuous green spaces in the city and has activities for every lifestyle. It’s most easily accessible from Sparta tram stop via trams 1, 8, 12, 25,and 26. If the stairs leading up to the Metronom aren’t too intimidating, you can climb up from Čechův Most.  With its many playgrounds, eating areas, and shady paths, Letná is a popular, family-friendly meeting point.

In Czech language, letná means “summer”
In Czech language, letná means “summer” 

Exercising Your Athleticism in Letná Park

A newly renovated asphalt and dirt track is on the north side of the park, just past the Letná Plain. It’s 1.3 km in diameter and is popular with rollerbladers, as it is one of the few urban areas without cobblestones. The dirt track around the edge is designed for runners concerned with running on hard surfaces or in city traffic. Work out stations around the track will help you incorporate a full body workout into your routine. These include balance beams, in-ground trampolines, swings, and a rope climbing wall. New construction on the track from 2019 will include bathrooms, a snack bar, and picnic table seating for a comfortable day in the park. 

Running Path Praha Channel your inner Spartan on the track.
Channel your inner Spartan on the track.

LTC Tennis Club was founded in 1904 by law students of Charles University and serves as one of the oldest tennis clubs in the Czech Republic. They have used the same traditional clay courts for over 100 years in the center of Letná Park and can be reserved on their website.

Play a game on LTC's historic courts
Play a game on LTC’s historic courts

The Letná Plain

The plain between Sparta tram stop and the running track is often used to host events, festivals, and extra parking for the Sparta stadium, but it also carries historical significance: it served as the location of the largest demonstration of the Velvet Revolution on 25 and 26 November, 1989. Over 750,000 attendees protested the Communist party’s grasp on Czechoslovakia. On 23 June, 2019, Letná Plain once again served as demonstration grounds for Milion Chvilek (“A Million Moments for Democracy”), a group dedicated to seeing Andrej Babiš resign as Prime Minister over scandals regarding suspected European Union subsidy fraud. According to T-Mobile cell tower data, an estimated 283,000 people attended the protest.

Novak’s Metronom

In 1955, the Soviet Union unveiled an imposing statue to Joseph Stalin at the top of Letná Hill, on the steep embankment overlooking the city. The statue was wildly unpopular with Czechs and a running joke was that the carving of working class citizens behind Stalin looked like they were waiting in a breadline. In 1962, the statue was demolished with explosives, leaving behind an area of smooth granite that remains a popular meeting point for skateboarders.

In 1991,  Vratislav Novák built the fully functional Metronon as an art installation. The space underneath the Metronom acted as a bomb shelter for many years, then as a nightclub, but is currently used for museum and art exhibitions. Warm summer nights bring out stands of drink sellers, skaters, and young crowds admiring the evening sky over Old Town.

Skating Metronom Prague

Beer Garden in Letná Park

Any warm day is sure to pack the Letná Beer Garden with locals and tourists alike, so be prepared to hunt for a seat. It has hundreds of picnic tables and a variety of vendors serving traditional czech beer and food under the shade of trees and umbrellas. With great views of the whole city, access to bathrooms, and a playground for children, it is an outing for the whole family. Most vendors operate only with cash, so come prepared with small bills and a big appetite.

Beer Garden Prague  Bottoms up at Letná Beer Garden- na zdravi!
Bottoms up at Letná Beer Garden- na zdravi!


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